Archive for the ‘mobile marketing’ Category

Articles

Viral communication on a viral issue

In blogs,Facebook,mobile marketing,Uncategorized on October 22, 2009 by gingercatmom

H1N1 flu information is almost as widespread as the virus itself. Since this influenza strain appeared earlier in 2009, both state and federal government agencies have used a combination of traditional and emerging media to spread the word on the spread of the flu!

Taking a look at the CDC website http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1FLU/, here’s a summary of how emerging media is working to help health professionals and the public at large. I think it’s a great example of how to communicate a message quickly, consistently and efficiently to all audiences.

Readers can sign up for an RSS feed on disease updates, request daily email updates, follow the site on Twitter, download podcasts. There’s a flu.gov widget that can be downloaded, a CDC WebMD FluBlog, a text message option, and even an e-card that can be sent saying “Good Health is in your Hands”. Buttons and badges are available for websites and social networking applications—in both English and Spanish.

The CDC also has a presence on three social network sites: Facebook, MySpace and DailyStrength. The CDC Facebook page, launched in May 2009 attracted 14,000 fans by July 31 and that count has now more than doubled to almost 31,000.

To assist media, a library of H1N1 Flu Audio and Video Resources includes webcasts, audio and video podcasts, public service announcements are available and health professionals can use prerecorded educational audio messages for on-hold messaging.

These are tremendous resources for all of us who want to stay well and help others find the most current information on this disease. There is a level of confusion among the public—we in healthcare call them the “worried well”–and CDC has answers available via the most commonly used emerging media channels.

So…in the spirit of the CDC’s H1N1 website, I encourage you to spread the word—not the virus. Wash your hands, stay informed, and stay home if you’re sick! Stay well MindChow readers!

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Articles

There’s an app for that…

In ad campaigns,mobile marketing,social issues and new media,Uncategorized on October 16, 2009 by gingercatmom

I’ve been hearing a radio commercial this week for Verizon. Mocking the iPhone commercial’s tagline, “there’s an app for that” Verizon says “There’s a map for that…”. I had to listen closely because I knew iPhones were not on the Verizon network and the whole thing didn’t make sense at first. It certainly was a dig against AT&T, but it got me thinking about apps and what they mean to us today.

Isn’t it amazing how a three letter word–app–has so quickly become part of our vernacular?
App is short for application. Apps add function to mobile devices like the iPhone. Like the Apple commercial demonstrates, there is an app for almost anything–from calorie counters to tip calculators. Some apps are informative and some are purely entertaining. In an app store, users can download apps at varying prices, depending on who developed the application and its purpose. Most paid downloads are relatively low priced.

Marketers considering developing apps must be mindful of the cost. According to Forrester Research, apps typically cost between $20,000 and $150,000 to develop. Many brands will want to give away their apps if they want to achieve viral marketing success.

The best apps are simple, work on a variety of platforms (think iPhone, Blackberry, etc) and unique. But before including mobile apps in the marketing mix, it’s important to know how your audience is using mobile devices. You might want to take a survey…and there might even be an app for that too!

There’s no doubt that mobile marketing will boom in the years ahead! Mobile apps offer a golden opportunity to get your brand message right in your target audience’s hands—again and again.

Articles

Mobile marketing never smelled so sweet

In ad campaigns,advergaming,mobile devices,mobile marketing on October 4, 2009 by gingercatmom

Ask any adolescent what Axe smells like…and you’re likely to get a response. Love it or hate it, Axe has become the scent of many teen boys–and the boys’ locker room! Popularity is growing and mobile marketing campaigns have something to do with that.

Unilever (which markets Axe as well as a variety of other personal care products) has hit on a successful combination of product, message and media to promote this line of body sprays, body washes, deodorants and hair care items. Axe knows that teen boys want to smell good. Axe also knows that teen boys like to play games. And Axe knows that teen boys love their cell phones…hence the Axe Pogo Extreme game.

To teach teen boys how to properly use the body sprays, Axe launched a multi-platform game initiative that included mobile, web games and console media. The campaign introduces boys to the ‘Double Pits to Chesty’ move (a spray under the pits and across the chest). Game player execute pogo stick moves to earn cans of Axe spray in the game and are then prompted by a sexy girl voice and animated figure to do the body spray move described above. The free application is available through the web for phones and PlayStation 3.

Educational (well, most teens can use some hygiene education), fun and cool all at the same time, Axe Pogo Extreme is an example of both Advergaming and Mobile Marketing. The mobile marketing campaigns that Axe has executed have been creative and entertaining, and supporting media have promoted benefits of enjoyment, usefulness and expressiveness to users, thereby encouraging the target audience–young males– to accept and even embrace the Axe campaigns and ultimately the products themselves.

Further, the most successful mobile marketers worldwide are trusted, recognized brands. For the young male market, Axe does represent a product line that is familiar and associated with current trends and style—much like mobile communications itself. Positive attitudes generated through mobile campaigns like the Axe examples can benefit other brands that discover mobile marketing as an ideal way to reach particular demographic groups.

Articles

Family routines get rewired

In Facebook,mobile devices,mobile marketing,social issues and new media,Uncategorized on September 15, 2009 by gingercatmom

There’s no doubt that technology has changed the ways families interact today. As I write this, three of my family members are working on laptops in three different rooms–one in front of a TV as well. My Blackberry sits next to my laptop and I’m eagerly awaiting a return text message from my college student son. This is just a typical night for us–and millions of other Americans.

The New York Times described how household routines have been shaken up by the rapid integration of new technology. We used to awake to alarm clocks–now we wake to the alarm on our I-Pod or cellphone. We greet the day with technology and it’s often the last thing we encounter at night. Kids aren’t just distracted by morning TV shows. They’re checking their Facebook page, playing a video game or texting their friends. There are a million new reasons to be late for school.

Dont miss the bus! Have mom send you a text.

Don't miss the bus! Have mom send you a text.

Adults are just as eager to get up and get online. The workday never ends when we’re connected 24/7 via mobile devices and our wireless laptops. We try to get an hour of work in before we’ve even stepped in the shower. We steal a look at our email on the way to the coffee pot. For many of us, the days of reading the newspaper over a cup of coffee seem a nostalgic thing of the past.

The New York Times article references an Arbor Networks study that finds that American Web traffic peaks at 11 p.m., gradually declines from midnight to 6 a.m. and then spikes up again at 7 a.m. At least we can rejoice in the fact that most of us get a little rest before we log on to another wired day.

So what does this mean to the American family?  Making a conscious effort to find balance and to stay connected through real, live face-to-face family contact is more difficult than ever before. Our daily rituals may be changing, but we just might find that these changes enrich our lives in ways we just can’t fully understand yet. And what’s “new” today is the next generation’s “old-fashioned”.